The choice of opening a laboratory facility in European territory is often an obligated step for biotechnology companies that are not based in the European Union (EU) but seek to expand their business in the Old World. Unlike it used to be, for example, an American pharmaceutical or biotechnology company can no longer rely on the data submitted to the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to obtain a European Commission to approve a drug, a product, or a service. In the specific case of clinical trials to approve new therapeutics, the EU would require that the work be conducted in a European country, so that the process will be compliant with local rules and regulation.
Given this scenario, the problem of which European country to pick for a branch of an existing company ensues. Should Italy be considered? Does the boot-shaped country offers the appropriate environment to make this goal happen? We believe it does. To convince us were Renold Capocasale, founder and CEO of Flowmetric Europe, and Gianluca Carenzo, executive manager of the Parco Tecnologico Padano in Lodi, where Flowmetric Europe is located. We talked to them in occasion of the most recent visit of Capocasale to Lodi.

Renold Capocasale, founder and CEO of Flowmetric Europe

Renold Capocasale, founder and CEO of Flowmetric Europe

Capocasale explained that back in 2010, after working for a long time for a major American pharmaceutical company, he felt like times were mature for launching his own business and he proceeded to found Flowmetric Inc. This contract research organization (CRO) located in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, provides state-of-the-art flow cytometry and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) services across the entire chain of drug development, from pre-clinical to clinical development. Moved by a farsighted entrepreneurial spirit, Capocasale immediately posed the issue of the necessity to open a facility overseas to support the needs of European clients and to develop partnerships with European pharmaceutical companies, research institutes, and hospitals.

The encounter in 2011 with Gianluca Carenzo and his team from the Parco Tecnologico Padano convinced Capocasale that Italy was the right country to invest in and where, in spite of preconceptions, high quality scientists are available as well as the appropriate infrastructures, and where adequate laws are in place to support and facilitate such a remarkable entrepreneurial effort. In the end, the skepticism about bringing Flowmetric to Italy was overcome, and Flowmetric Europe made his debut in the European arena in September 2013, after an investment of 1 million euro and the choice of the Parco Tecnologico Padano as its business incubator.

Gianluca Carenzo, executive manager of the Parco Tecnologico Padano in Lodi

Gianluca Carenzo, executive manager of the Parco Tecnologico Padano in Lodi

Dr. Carenzo highlighted how, in his opinion, Italy is now a fertile ground for foreign biotech companies to invest, and where the convergence of resources, projects, and know-how can lead to the genesis of a successful reality such as Flowmetric Europe. The company currently provides its services to more than 100 clients, including major pharmaceutical companies. Flowmetric Europe was recently awarded with the Invest In Lombardy award, a recognition that further strengthens how, in the end, Renold Capocasale made the right choice of place and partners for his European adventure.

 

The Flowmetric Paradigm speed read:

– Flowmetric Europe made his debut in the European arena in September 2013

– The company currently provides its services to more than 100 clients, including major pharmaceutical companies

lorenzo giacani

lorenzo giacani

Lorenzo lives and works in the United States as Assistant Professor in the Departments of Medicine and Global Health at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he moved to in 2002. He serves as the chair of the Seattle chapter of the Italian Scientists and Scholars in North America Foundation.
lorenzo giacani